4th of July Weekend Online Restaurant Deals

Independence Day weekend is known for great shopping deals. But did you know you can find big savings at restaurants as well? Several popular restaurant deal websites are offering even bigger discounts over the next five days. So if you plan on dining out, you definitely want to check out these deals first! We’ll update the list as more are announced over the weekend.

localflavor_minAdditional 25% off ALL DEALS at LocalFlavor! Use promo code: DRUM (valid 6/29-7/4)
restaurant_minGet 4 $25 Gift Certificates for just $20! (Valid 6/29 - 7/5)
entertainmentAll 2017 Entertainment Coupon Books are $7.76 plus free shipping! Use code: JULY4 (Valid 6/30/17 - 7/5/17)

Each of these sites has thousands of restaurants with deals so you are sure to find some near you. Find the restaurants offering deals at all the popular dining deal sites on Cravor.

10 of the Most Unique Dining Experiences Across the Country

We’ve scoured the top food authority sites, blogs and food enthusiasts to bring you the 10 most unique (and some slightly strange) dining experiences from Chicago to Napa Valley!

 

Wine Train Dining in Napa Valley

Who’s Pick: Fodor’s Travel

The plush Napa Valley Wine Train takes the concept of wine and dine onto the tracks, in restored 20th-century Pullman or Visa Dome cars. As you glide past the vineyards of California’s wine country in the mahogany-clad train car, savor delicious bites, such as the tenderloin in a Cabernet Sauvignon reduction.

1

A Reclaimed Bank and a VIP Vault Room

Who’s Pick: Twisted Sifter

Located in Chicago’s Wicker Park, The Bedford reclaimed a historic private bank from 1926 and transformed the space into a supper club. The 8,000-square foot (743 sq. m) lower-level interior features terracotta, marble and terrazzo, all reclaimed and restored from the original bank. Inside the VIP vault room, the walls are lined with more than 6,000 working copper lock boxes.

2 

Ninja New York

Who’s Pick: Reader’s Digest

In a review in the New York Times, Frank Bruni describes Ninja New York as “a kooky, dreary subterranean labyrinth… You are greeted there by servers in black costumes who ceaselessly bow, regularly yelp and ever so occasionally tumble.” Designed to look like a 15th-century Japanese feudal village full of dark nooks and snaking passageways, you’ll dine amongst stealthy warriors—the waiters—who roam, romp, and perform tricks, all the while serving sushi and sake. Just call it Japanese fare mixed with martial arts flair at its best.

3

High-Altitude Dining at the Ledge at Skydeck Chicago

Who’s Pick: Fodor’s Travel

Comfort food is taken to new heights at The Ledge at Skydeck, which serves famous Chicago-style stuffed pizzas from Giordano’s in a collection of private glass boxes that extend beyond the 103rd floor of Willis Tower. Or opt for Oysters Rockefeller and three-hour short ribs to complement the city lights sparkling 1353 feet below.

4

Joanie’s Blue Crab Cafe

Who’s Pick: The Food Network

Take two steps outside Joanie’s Blue Crab Cafe and you’re likely to spot an alligator — or two, or three. Located in the heart of the swampy Everglades, this crazy restaurant is surrounded by tons of the meaty reptiles, which diners enjoy in the form of chili, ribs and, most popularly, deep-fried gator nuggets.

5

The Airplane Restaurant

Who’s Pick: Travel + Leisure

Putting the diner in airplane dining, this Colorado Springs landmark is on a mission, code name: delicious. Owners gutted a decommissioned 1953 Boeing KC-97 military tanker to make room for booths and a bar, decorating it and the main restaurant spaces with tons of aviation memorabilia. Naturally, the menu is loaded with aviation puns and references as well, such as the Philly Flyer sandwich and Air.  Tower nachos. For more information on the Airplane Restaurant, click here.

Find Colorado Springs restaurant deals.

 6

The Cave

Who’s Pick: CNBC

The Cave is the nation’s only restaurant located in (you guessed it) a cave, serving American steakhouse/seafood and Italian fare. Located in Richland, Missouri, the space may not get much natural light, but it has waterfalls, fish ponds, and even a view of the Gasconade River. The space began as a natural cave that served as a dance hall in the 1920s, situated three stories up on a limestone bluff at a campground (visitors can still rent the cabins). Back then it was not spacious enough for 225 to dine, as it is today; the rest was carved and blasted out over the course of four years.

7

B.E.D Miami

Who’s Pick: One Click Wonders

Instead of breakfast in bed, how about dinner? B.E.D. stands for beverage, entertainment, dining, and that’s exactly what you get…in bed! Executive chef Vitor Casassola’s menu includes cold appetizers like camembert tempura and tomatillo guacamole and entrees like surf & turf and Chilean seabass. And for dessert, an edible “pillow” called Cloud 9 Souffle.

8

Opaque

Who’s Pick: Cheat Sheet

Located in Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco, Opaque diners enjoy their meals in a pitch-black room after selecting their menu items in a lit room. The theory proposed by the restaurant is that when a diner’s visual senses are cut off, other senses such are heightened which makes for a delicious dinner!

9

Heart Attack Grill

Who’s Pick: Thrillist

One of the few places in Vegas where the food and the waitresses will raise a diner’s blood pressure! This famous hospital-themed joint, Heart Attack Grill specializes in artery-clogging, four-patty Quadruple Bypass burgers, and serves anyone who weighs in at over 350lbs for free. See more deals on dining in Las Vegas.

10

7 Things That Annoy True Foodies

1. People who “hate” foods they’ve never tried.
Anne: Ew, gross. How can you eat raw fish?
Foodie: It’s delicious. Have you ever tried sushi?
Anne: No, never. I hate sushi.
Sushi
2. Dining out with someone who’s on a diet.
Joy: I think I’m just going to have an appetizer.
Foodie: Okay, well I hope you brought a book to read while I enjoy my second and third courses.
Appetizer
3. People who think Ramen Noodles are solely a college student’s cuisine.
Joe: You’re eating Ramen? Are you poor?
Foodie: I topped it with steak…
Noodles
4. Having to eat an entree at a wedding reception.
Foodie: I’ll just fill up on cocktail hour hors d’oeuvres, then smear the dinner around my plate to look like I ate some of it.
Wedding
5. Coworkers who bring peanut butter and jelly sandwiches for lunch.
Mark: Mmm, this is so good. I’ve eaten the same thing for lunch since third grade.
Foodie: Can this day get more depressing?
PBJ
6. Chain restaurants that have recently discovered avocado, or kale, and use it as a marketing strategy.
Generic-chain-restaurant-commercial: Try our new chicken wrap (which is really our old chicken wrap but now with… avocado!)
Avocado
7. People who can’t pronounce quinoa.
Mary: What’s a kin-o-wah salad?
Foodie: I don’t know.
RestaurantGirls

My Food Expense Analysis

After one week of documenting what I spent on supermarket trips, convenience store stops, restaurants and fast food meals, my one-week food expense journal is complete. Here’s my analysis chart:

WeeklySpending

In one week, I spent $159 on food. I spent the least amount of money on fast food (10%). I guess that’s a good thing because I’ve heard it’s not all that healthy (ha). It’s also cheap, so it makes sense that fast food comprises the smallest category of my spending.

Next came supermarket spending (23%). Going forward, I’d like to see a higher percent spent on cost-efficient supermarket shopping than on restaurants and convenience stores.

At convenience stores you pay for just that – convenience. I’m sure this category (25%) was made up of my least cost-efficient choices. Finally, restaurants take first place in my spending experiment at 42% of my weekly food food budget (or lack thereof)! This probably has a lot to do with the higher cost of restaurant meals in general, combined with the need to tip, and perhaps my frequenting them too often.

But what’s a foodie to do? I won’t give up dining out. Homemade is great, but it doesn’t eliminate the need (ok, desire) for professionally prepared and served meals. Restaurant coupons and discounts are out there, but often hard to find right when you need them and where you need them. Websites like cravor.com make it easier. For instance, instead of paying full price two nights ago at Cheesecake Factory, I could have had Cravor search the web for deals at this chain.

So, that’s one of my goals: use more restaurant deals. Another goal is to cook more and become supermarket savvy. Over the next few weeks I’ll work on revamping my spending habits. I’ll check in with stories, recipes, and tips for dining for less. One thing I know is: I’m going to keep craving, but hopefully I’ll start saving! See you soon…

Foodeloo!

Can I Save More Money on Food?

I always wonder how much money I spend on food every week. I really have no idea; not even a ballpark guess. Maybe it’s more that I don’t want to know, because I’m sure it’s more than what the money-saving experts recommend.

For a while I’ve thought about figuring out what I actually spend in a week. You know, collecting restaurant and supermarket receipts, or keeping some kind of food expense journal. But I haven’t done it. It could be laziness, or lack of time, or a whole list of excuses. What I think it is – like I said – I just don’t want to know. I don’t want to know about all the money I threw away, or how much I could have saved instead.

But I’ve finally decided it’s time to face the facts. It’s time to admit (to myself) my poor spending habits and find out exactly how much damage has been done. Only then can I turn a new leaf, and become a savvy food-shopper and diner.

So, if you’d like to follow my experiment, check back for updates as I document one week of food purchases. After I collect the data, I’ll do an expense analysis and ultimately decide: Can I be saving more money on meals? And if so, how?

That very question – how? – will be the inspiration for the rest of this blog. I hope you’ve enjoyed reading my first post, and more importantly, I hope you hold me accountable for my one-week food expense journal (if you don’t, who else will?) For those who follow along, I’ll share my findings, new goals, and money-saving tips! Please feel free to share your own tips or comments!

Foodeloo!